Let’s Let AI Write An Article About ‘sed’

Today’s article is going to be about ‘sed’. However, I’ll be letting AI write it, just so we have an excuse to play with ChatGPT. I love new tech and I’m going to go against the advice given and just post the resulting article directly. 

Also, I picked ‘sed’ as an article topic because it’s a pain in the butt to explain even the basics. It’s such a powerful tool that knowing where to start can be tough. As such, I’ve decided it’s a perfect article for testing AI. I will only be formatting the suggested article.

Hey, it was this or write a meta article. I hadn’t written one for February and this will be the last article in February. Not much had changed, though we did cross some milestones, and I figured this article would be even more interesting to my readers.

Again, if there are errors, I am not to blame. I am posting the entire output after asking ChatGPT to write the article. I am only editing for the format. So, read on to see how AI is coming along. Hint: It’s doing well! It’s coming along nicely!

About ‘sed’:

“sed” is a stream editor in the Unix-like operating systems. It is used to perform basic text transformations on an input stream (a file or input from a pipeline). The sed command reads the specified files, or standard input if no files are specified, and applies the transformations which have been specified.

The syntax for using sed is:

Where OPTIONS can be any of the options available in the man page and COMMANDS are the instructions that tell sed what transformations to perform on the input.

One of the most common uses of sed is to replace strings. The basic syntax for string substitution is:

Where old-text is the text you want to replace, and new-text is the text you want to replace it with. For example, to replace the word “apple” with “banana” in the file “fruits.txt”, the following command could be used:

You can also use regular expressions in the old-text argument to match a more complex pattern. For example, to replace all occurrences of “apple” or “Apple” with “banana”, the following command could be used:

Another common use of sed is to delete lines. To delete a line, you can use the d command. For example, to delete the first line of the file “fruits.txt”, the following command could be used:

To delete multiple lines, specify the line numbers separated by a comma. For example, to delete lines 1 to 3 in the file “fruits.txt”, the following command could be used:

sed also supports multiple commands in a single execution. Simply separate the commands with a semicolon (;). For example, to delete the first line and replace “apple” with “banana” in the file “fruits.txt”, the following command could be used:

In addition to the commands mentioned above, there are many other powerful commands available in sed, such as inserting text, printing selected lines, and more. To learn more about these commands and other features of sed, consult the man page by running man sed in your terminal.

In conclusion, the sed command is a useful tool for performing basic text transformations on files or input from a pipeline. Its syntax is straightforward, and its wide range of commands makes it versatile enough to handle a variety of text manipulation tasks.

Closure:

There you have it. You have an article about sed – and it wasn’t written by me. So, what do you think of it? Do you think I can hang up my hat and just let AI write my articles from here on out? Do you spot any mistakes? It’s supposed to be an overview, not a complete dissertation. I think it does surprisingly well!

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How To: Return To The Previous Working Directory In The Terminal

Today is another easy day, but one that should be productive, where we’ll learn how to return to the previous working directory. It will be a short article, but you might find it useful. If nothing else, we’re making the more terminal accessible to new users. 

These Linux tips needed to be shared some time, so it might as well be now. I don’t wish to air my medical issues, but my ailment has gone on long enough and I went to a medical professional this morning. I’m sure I’ll be fine. They say only the good die young, so I’m probably gonna live forever!

Anyhow, to learn how to return to the previous working directory (in the terminal, of course), read on! I promise, it’s easy. It’s one simple command and that’s all there is to it.

Return To The Previous Working Directory:

This article requires an open terminal, like many other articles on this site. If you don’t know how to open the terminal, you can do so with your keyboard – just press CTRL + ALT + T and your default terminal should open.

This is probably more useful for very-nested directories with long names, but it won’t take that to demonstrate today’s subject. It’s not terribly complicated.

Let’s say that you’ve navigated to ~/foo and performed some functions there. Next, you’ve navigated to ~/bar and performed some functions there. Now, if you want to return to the ~/foo directory you can do so with just a simple – added to your cd command, like so:

If that’s confusing, I’ve made an image that explains it better than I can…

use cd - to return to the previous working directory
It’s a simple concept. It’s a simple article about how to return to the previous working directory.

See? It’s nice and simple! If you were in one directory and left to go to a new directory, then it’s trivial to return to the previous working directory. The image should help make it clear if my description is lacking.

You might also be interested in:

Let’s Learn About Absolute And Relative Paths
How To: Find Your Present Working Directory
How To: Make A Directory In Linux

(There are a whole lot of articles with the word ‘directory’ in them!)

Closure:

I know… I know… This is a lot of short articles in a row. I’ll feel better. I’m sure of it! Amusingly, I was asked if I had any stress in my life and it was comforting to answer that I do not. My life is pretty drama free, but I do need to get an article out every other day! This time, I’ve shown you a quick and easy way to return to the previous working directory. It’s quick, easy, and effective!

Thanks for reading! If you want to help, or if the site has helped you, you can donate, register to help, write an article, or buy inexpensive hosting to start your own site. If you scroll down, you can sign up for the newsletter, vote for the article, and comment.

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Navigate To The Start Or End Of The Line (In The Terminal)

Today is going to be another simple article, where you learn to navigate to the start or end of the line – in the terminal, of course. I’ve had some abdominal issues, so it seems like a good day for yet another accessible article.

Even though it’s an easy article, there will be many Linux users who don’t know this information. I’m not even sure how to describe it, thus the unwieldy article headline. So, if you want to navigate to the start or end of the line in the terminal, I’ll show you how.

This being Linux, there are so many ways to do this sort of stuff…

Imagine this:

You’re using Ubuntu and you want to update from within the terminal. So, you’ve typed the following:

Well, as you can see, the first instance of ‘sudo’ was spelled wrong – it’s missing a letter. You can reach over there and find the arrow buttons, navigate back to the start of the line, and fix it. Or, you can do the following:

Navigate To The Start Or End Of The Line:

As the title indicates, this is in the terminal. As such, you’ll need an open terminal to try this out. Just press CTRL + ALT + T and your default terminal should open.

With your terminal now open, why don’t we just use that line from above:

Of course, you could just look at your keyboard and (probably) use the HOME button to navigate to the start of the line. Of course, you could then use the END button to navigate to the end of the line. If you’re on a laptop, those keys can be placed most anywhere, though it’s far more standardized with a regular keyboard.

But, you don’t have to reach for those lines. Nope. That is not necessary. You can keep your eyes right on the screen. How so?

Well, it’s this easy:

To navigate to the start of the line, press CTRL + A.

To navigate to the end of the line, press CTRL + E.

Tada! You don’t have to root around for the home or end buttons. You don’t have to fuss with the arrow buttons. You can quickly and easily navigate to the start and end of the line with just those two keyboard shortcuts. I told you that it’d be quick and easy!

Closure:

There you have it, you have another article. This one is pretty simple but that’s okay. So long as it’s sharing some knowledge and I managed to get an article out on schedule, it’s all good by me. This time, you’ve learned how to navigate to the start of end of the line – in the terminal and without taking your eyes off the screen.

You might as well memorize the shortcuts as they appear to be pretty universal from my testing. They’ll likely be faster for you than any of the other methods, so they’re worth learning and adding to your growing toolbox of Linux tools. Ideally, my ailments will go away soon… I’m hopeful…

Thanks for reading! If you want to help, or if the site has helped you, you can donate, register to help, write an article, or buy inexpensive hosting to start your own site. If you scroll down, you can sign up for the newsletter, vote for the article, and comment.

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Clear The Terminal

Today’s article will be a nice and easy article, where we learn how to clear the terminal. That is, we will clear any typed text and returned information from the terminal. This will be a nice and quick article.

I am feeling like garbage today and I still need to edit the last article. Ugh… But, the show must go on!

This is what I get for not having scheduled a few articles ahead. Fortunately, I have short articles in mind. Today is a good day for just that.

It should be noted that clearing the screen doesn’t delete your scrollback history. Someone could come along and use the up arrow to see your previously typed commands. If you’re at your workstation then I guess you could consider this a privacy measure – but it certainly shouldn’t be considered much of a security measure.

So, as I said, it’ll be a short article. Let’s just jump into it…

Clear The Terminal:

This article requires an open terminal, like many other articles on this site. If you don’t know how to open the terminal, you can do so with your keyboard – just press CTRL + ALT + T and your default terminal should open.

Now, let’s generate some content… Run the following:

That should fill up your terminal with stuff. Now, let’s clear the terminal. Type the following command:

Tada!

But wait, there’s more!

Run those commands again. This time, and this appears to be pretty universal, just use your keyboard and press CTRL + L.

See? It does the same thing as you get when you type clear. Those are two ways for you to use when you want to clear the terminal.

Closure:

Yup… You’ve learned how to clear the terminal. I told you that it’d be a short article. It’s even an easy article. Now I’m going to lie down and hope for a nap. 

Thanks for reading! If you want to help, or if the site has helped you, you can donate, register to help, write an article, or buy inexpensive hosting to start your own site. If you scroll down, you can sign up for the newsletter, vote for the article, and comment.

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Find Files Owned By A Specific User

In today’s article, we’re going to explore one way to find files owned by a specific user. We’ll be using the ‘find’ command for this exercise, which means it’s probably an article more for an intermediate user than a Linux beginner.

NOTE: This article is mostly a duplicate of an earlier article. I didn’t realize that until after I was done and hit the preview button. So, I saved it as an unpublished article, with the goal of just hitting the publish button (scheduling it, really) when I had a day where I was just otherwise occupied. Today is that day. After all, the “Big Game” starts in about 30 minutes.

But… I’ll do my best to make it one small bite that’s useful for beginners, but there’s no guarantee. I’ll see what I can do! So, if you want to play around with the ‘find’ command, read on!

The ‘find’ command does pretty much what you’d expect it to do, given the name. It’s used to find things – so you don’t have to stretch your imagination any to figure this command out based on the name.

You’ll find that ‘find’ describes itself succinctly, as this:

find – search for files in a directory hierarchy

See? Pretty much exactly as you’d expect. As you can also see, you’re probably gonna be asked to specify a directory. We can do that! Even you new Linux users can do that. I have faith in you!

So then, with that information freshly reviewed, there’s no reason to make the intro any longer. Let’s just jump into the article…

Find Files Owned By A Specific User:

If you’re a regular reader, you know what’s coming…

This article requires an open terminal, like many other articles on this site. If you don’t know how to open the terminal, you can do so with your keyboard – just press CTRL + ALT + T and your default terminal should open.

Let’s start by finding files owned by you in the ‘Downloads’ directory. With the open terminal, enter the following:

Now, the ‘.’ is telling the ‘find’ command to search the current directory. You have to specify the username. For example, with me, it’d be:

You can also specify another user. Want to see if ‘root’ owns any of the files in your ‘Downloads’ directory? You can do that. Just change the username, like so:

Want to find all the files owned by root on the whole system? Well, you can do that – but it’s gonna be a whole lot of files and is going to take a while to run. You just specify the root directory (not to be confused with the root user). You do that like so:

In that command, you’ll notice we switched the path. We changed it to ‘/’ which is the root of the file system. You can be even find out if root owns any files in your user directory. Try this:

In my case, I’ve done things like compile and install software from my ~/Downloads directory, so I actually have files in there that are owned by root. If you’re a new user, you quite likely won’t have anything like that going on.

Play around with the ‘find’ command a bit, and it’ll become a bit more clear. Don’t forget to run man find to learn more about the command. There’s a lot more to it and it can be a pretty useful command.

Closure:

Anyhow, that’s a small bite of the ‘find’ command – but it’s a useful bite. The goal is to take a small bite and do what I can to make it approachable by even a new Linux user. Hopefully, I’ve done just that. Give me a yell if you think it worked – or if you think it didn’t work. 

Thanks for reading! If you want to help, or if the site has helped you, you can donate, register to help, write an article, or buy inexpensive hosting to start your own site. If you scroll down, you can sign up for the newsletter, vote for the article, and comment.

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